How to Improve Your Deer Hunting

If you are a veteran hunter, then you may have already applied some tricks to improve your hunting. However, if you are heading out to the forest for the first time then don’t ignore these tips that can make you a pro deer hunter. Irrespective of your experience it is always better to check out new techniques and tricks that are meant to help you. Here, we go;

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#1 Tip – Scouting the Hunting Area

There is not a better survey opportunity than airborne scouting. If you are planning to scout your hunting areas, but hesitating for you neither own a plane, nor enough cash for an air trip to study the region aloft. Try Google Maps – it can serve your purpose effectively.

#2 Tip – Practice Makes a Man Perfect

It is not an easy task to get your tree stand set up and dismantling it. Practice way before the hunting season. Further, you need to master the tricky art of getting into and out of your hideout without being detected. Darkness may not serve as a good. Use a cover of the forest as a guard.

Many hunters fall while hiking into or out of the tree stand. Even if you have practiced, wear a full body safety harness to protect yourself.

#3 Tip – Preparing for the Hunt

  1. Take a shower with an unscented soap right before the trip. Your smell can unnerve the deer.
  2. Wash your hunting wear with odor-free detergent. Carry them to the hunting ground in a plastic or bad filled with leaves, dirt around your hunting ground so that it can absorb some of the natural scents.
  3.  Preparing with the right hunting equipment like, rifle, file scope, rifle stand, bow, and others accessories. Read more to get enough ideas about the hunting equipment and accessories.

#4 Tip – Never Disturb the Ground

Don’t trim or disturb the shooting ground  during the hunting season. If you want to do it, save it for summer. Clever deer would get accustomed to the freshly cut timber and would relate it with human presence.

#5 Tip – Pay Attention to Your Camouflage

  1. Do you use any hunting scent eliminator when setting up? That is a nice trick. Now, carry the spray with you to your special hideout. When you reach, apply some more on your body, especially your hair and hat.
  2. Good! You are wearing a camouflaging jacket and pants. If you think it is good, go for better. There are blinds for tree stands that save you from the wary eyes of the deer. Plus, save you from harsh winds.

#6 Tip – Draw the Buck

Try out buck scent. Many think that estrous doe scent is a nice way to attract the bucks. However, it works only for a specific season. In October, bucks don’t find the estrous doe scent sensible. One can try checking the buck scent – worth a try!

You have sighted a buck in the field nearby, but he is not nearing you. What should you do? Don’t leave your camouflage and pursue your kill. Entice it to come close to you with a bait or deer call.

#7 Tip – Make a Buck Follow Your Trail

If you are hunting in peak-rut phase, soak a rag in doe estrous and drag it towards your stand. Don’t be surprised if you see a buck picking up your trail.

#8 Tip – Play with the Wind

Wind can challenge all your scent arrangements if you cannot shield your human odor. Find a cover or timber piece that can guard you along your length. Pour some deer scent on the timber as well as in other places from where the wind is blowing. Also, try to settle down high enough so that your whiff flows over your prey.

#9 Tip – Hunting in the Snow

Tracking and hunting in the snow is quite difficult and challenging. You need to identify if he is a mature buck or his herd. Hooves that are longer than 3-inches stepping more than 20 inches points to a large deer. Not every buck strides long.  Hence, you need to assess how deep his hooves drop into the snow.

Finally, be swift with your shot. You don’t get much chance to improvise your shot for better. If you try to maneuver, you don’t get to shoot the buck down. Analyze your shot once taken. From the wound, hair, and blood you can make out if you had a lung or heart or liver. A shot in the stomach is taken as a bad strike.

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How to Make Hunting Clothes Free from Your Scent?

Deer possess an unparalleled sense of smell that one can hardly imagine. Therefore, it is important for the hunter to minimize their odor. Here, we would be sharing some tips so that you and your hunting wears can go scent-free this trip;

Getting Yourself Scent-Free

Keeping yourself clean won’t help you to hit the big buck down. You need to start preparing yourself around six weeks ahead, which starts with taking a shower with hot water daily. But, remember that you cannot use any fragmented shampoo or soap. Use plain hot water. It is enough to cleanse your skin and scalp. However, if you’re working in a dirty environment and cannot go without a soap try this solution. Take 2 or 3 cups of water and mix ½ cup of baking soda in it. Store it in a squeeze bottle – use it whenever you need to remove the dirt and stinky odor from your skin and hair.

Both your skin and hair pick up the scent from the environment around. If you are smoking, then it is time to quit this bad habit. Otherwise, you would smell tobacco. Well, if you are failing to do so, at least use the baking soda-water mix to eliminate the smell.

If you need to apply some conditioner to keep your long hair manageable, you use apple cider or white vinegar thinned with water.

You can also use the scent-reducing soaps and shampoos that are available in the market. Some are successful in establishing their claims. But, for best results you need to use them over a long period of time.

Another important question is; how would you control your scent while hunting. The solution is to stay calm. If you are excited or scared, your glands get active and secrete pheromones and you sweat. Basically, you need to avoid perspiration. Dress up like an onion, move quietly and slowly to your secret hideaway where you don’t sweat.

Getting Your Clothes Scent-Free

You can use any of the scent-free products to make your clothes scent-free, but if you are using the same washer or dryer that you generally use the common detergents, brighteners and softeners, then your hunting clothes won’t be odorless.

Better hand wash your clothes and air dry them. It would be a laborious task to hand wash the soiled clothes. Here, are few steps to get it done. Check them out;

  1. Wash your clothes in cold water. Soak them overnight if they are really dirty. Cold water is suggested removing blood and other protein stains. Hot water is a strict – NO NO. If your clothes are wet and having light mildew smell – add ½ cup of vinegar to the soak. Once you rinse, even the vinegar smell will vanish.
  2. After soaking your clothes overnight, thrust in and out your clothes for a few minutes. It removes the soil slacken in the soak.
  3. Now chuck the soaking water. It’s dirty. Now refill container with cold water again and add ½ cup of baking soda to it. Now take one least soiled cloth at a time and stir up for a minute or two. You can put the container on a table while doing so – you don’t have to lean forward it. It is the hardworking part.
  4. Once all the clothes are washed, throw away the dirty water. And, plunge the garments in plain water to remove the baking soda if any. If the water turns soapy, dirty or dull after it, then you need to repeat this step again until you find the water is quite lucid after rinsing.
  5. Squeeze out the water with your hands. Getting the extra water out of the clothes will let them air dry within a reasonable time. You can also use a chamois towel for this. Stretch a garment on it and twist. Chamois is known for its absorbing power. It will absorb much of the remaining water from your garments.
  6. Now you can dry them. But, don’t put it into the dryer. Put it on a clothesline outdoors or on a rack indoors.
  7. Once they are completely dry, pack them and store them in a sealed plastic bag along with dry leaves and woods from your general hunting ground. It would absorb in the smell of the natural habitat of your prey.

Getting Yourself Scent-Free

Keeping yourself clean won’t help you to hit the big buck down. You need to start preparing yourself around six weeks ahead, which starts with taking a shower with hot water daily. But, remember that you cannot use any fragmented shampoo or soap. Use plain hot water. It is enough to cleanse your skin and scalp. However, if you’re working in a dirty environment and cannot go without a soap try this solution. Take 2 or 3 cups of water and mix ½ cup of baking soda in it. Store it in a squeeze bottle – use it whenever you need to remove the dirt and stinky odor from your skin and hair.

Both your skin and hair pick up the scent from the environment around. If you are smoking, then it is time to quit this bad habit. Otherwise, you would smell tobacco. Well, if you are failing to do so, at least use the baking soda-water mix to eliminate the smell.

If you need to apply some conditioner to keep your long hair manageable, you use apple cider or white vinegar thinned with water.

You can also use the scent-reducing soaps and shampoos that are available in the market. Some are successful in establishing their claims. But, for best results you need to use them over a long period of time.

Another important question is; how would you control your scent while hunting. The solution is to stay calm. If you are excited or scared, your glands get active and secrete pheromones and you sweat. Basically, you need to avoid perspiration. Dress up like an onion, move quietly and slowly to your secret hideaway where you don’t sweat.

Getting Your Clothes Scent-Free

You can use any of the scent-free products to make your clothes scent-free, but if you are using the same washer or dryer that you generally use the common detergents, brighteners and softeners, then your hunting clothes won’t be odorless.

Better hand wash your clothes and air dry them. It would be a laborious task to hand wash the soiled clothes. Here, are few steps to get it done. Check them out;

  1. Wash your clothes in cold water. Soak them overnight if they are really dirty. Cold water is suggested removing blood and other protein stains. Hot water is a strict – NO NO. If your clothes are wet and having light mildew smell – add ½ cup of vinegar to the soak. Once you rinse, even the vinegar smell will vanish.
  2. After soaking your clothes overnight, thrust in and out your clothes for a few minutes. It removes the soil slacken in the soak.
  3. Now chuck the soaking water. It’s dirty. Now refill container with cold water again and add ½ cup of baking soda to it. Now take one least soiled cloth at a time and stir up for a minute or two. You can put the container on a table while doing so – you don’t have to lean forward it. It is the hardworking part.
  4. Once all the clothes are washed, throw away the dirty water. And, plunge the garments in plain water to remove the baking soda if any. If the water turns soapy, dirty or dull after it, then you need to repeat this step again until you find the water is quite lucid after rinsing.
  5. Squeeze out the water with your hands. Getting the extra water out of the clothes will let them air dry within a reasonable time. You can also use a chamois towel for this. Stretch a garment on it and twist. Chamois is known for its absorbing power. It will absorb much of the remaining water from your garments.
  6. Now you can dry them. But, don’t put it into the dryer. Put it on a clothesline outdoors or on a rack indoors.
  7. Once they are completely dry, pack them and store them in a sealed plastic bag along with dry leaves and woods from your general hunting ground. It would absorb in the smell of the natural habitat of your prey.

Kids Hunting For A Cure

Members Making A Difference.

I’m proud to say I’m a life member of the North American Hunting Club, and on November 27, 2006, while hunting a small farm in Maryland, I took one of the largest non-typical white-tailed deer ever recorded on the entire East Coast, which I nicknamed “Big Buck.” It scores 268-1⁄8 Boone and Crockett Club points, sporting 28 scorable points.

From the very beginning, I wanted to do something special with this extremely extraordinary circumstance. I figured if I took my time with this opportunity, God would lead me in the correct direction and show me how to best handle the publicity generated by Big Buck—and, of course, He did.

After a ton of phone calls and e-mails, friend Gary Mason told me to contact Dave Norval, which turned out to be one of the best phone calls of my life. After a few more calls with Norval and Dr. John Waples, president of Kids Hunting for a Cure (KHFAC), I knew I had to be a part of what they were doing. Dr. Waples and Norval are two amazing men with hearts bigger than the state of Tennessee. I’ve since accepted the responsibility to be the assistant executive director for KHFAC.

Kids Hunting for a Cure is an amazing nonprofit organization that brings adults and children together in God’s great outdoors to raise money for cancer research.  Everyone involved in the program has either been affected by or knows someone that’s been affected by cancer.

Hunters are some of the greatest people in North America, and we at KHFAC are always looking for support to advance our mission and reach more kids in need. Today’s society is so fast-paced that it’s easy to forget what’s important. Take a few minutes and think about your first hunting experience, or first time in the outdoors. Reflect back and remember how exciting and special it was. That first trip could’ve been with your dad or uncle, or maybe your mother, brother or even sister. What’s important is that you were introduced to the outdoors and hunting by another hunter. This education system is very important to ensure this great sport is here for future generations to enjoy.

When you see a picture of Big Buck —or see a picture of Bucky, our KHFAC mascot—let your mind drift back to your first hunt or most memorable deer, and consider helping those kids still searching for those same experiences.

Every hunter has to start somewhere, and there are plenty of young guns waiting for your guidance. Good luck and safe hunting to all of my brothers and sisters in the Club.